Feb 022010
 

Credit card debt, steep mortgage loans, and large medical bills are financial difficulties that cause stress for married and common-law couples. These tips for helping your spouse through money problems can help strengthen your marriage – even in the worst of times.

Surprisingly, an overly supportive husband or wife can have a detrimental effect on a marriage or common-law relationship! A series of University of Iowa studies shows that too much support – or the wrong kind of support – can wreak havoc on a marriage.

These marriage tips are based on current research about husbands, wives, communication, and support. For more money tips for couples, click Love Marriage & Money: Understanding and Achieving Financial Compatibility Before–and After–You Say “I Do.” And, read on for six ways to cope with money problems in marriage.

Helping Your Spouse Through Financial Difficulties

“The idea that simply being more supportive is better for your marriage is a myth,” says Erika Lawrence, associate professor of psychology in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “Often husbands and wives think, ‘If my partner really knows me and loves me, he or she will know I’m upset and will know how to help me.’ However, that’s not the best way to approach your marriage. Your partner shouldn’t have to be a mind reader. Couples will be happier if they learn how to say, ‘This is how I’m feeling, and this is how you can help me.’”

Lawrence and colleagues discovered that receiving more support than desired is a greater risk factor for marital decline than not being there for a spouse. “If you don’t get enough support, you can make up for that with family and friends — especially women, who tend to have multiple sources of support,” she said. “When you receive too much support, there’s no way to adjust for that.”

These tips will help you give and receive the right amount of support in your relationship…

6 Tips for Supporting Your Husband or Wife

1. Learn about the different types of support in marriage. In Lawrence’s study, four kinds of support were identified: physical comfort and emotional support (listening and empathizing, taking your spouse’s hand, giving your spouse a hug), esteem support (expressing confidence in your partner, providing encouragement), informational support (giving advice, gathering information), and tangible support (taking on responsibilities so your spouse can deal with a problem, helping to brainstorm solutions to a problem).

2. Figure out the type of support your spouse needs. Just like there are different ways of giving and receiving love in relationships, there are different ways of giving and receiving support in marriage. For instance, your husband may feel most supported when you find and share information about saving money on medical care costs. In contrast, you might feel supported when your spouse does extra chores around the house. To cope with money problems in marriage, ask your spouse how he or she gives and receives support. Don’t guess!

3. Avoid giving too much “informational support.” The results of the University of Iowa study showed that too much informational support – usually in the form of unwanted advice-giving – is the most detrimental. Lawrence says husbands and wives can’t go wrong with esteem support. So, encourage your spouse by expressing confidence that you will overcome your money problems together.

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The rest of this article has been moved to my new site, “Quips and Tips for Love Relationships.”  

Please click 6 Ways to Support Your Spouse to continue reading.

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If your marriage is suffering because of financial stress, you may find Save My Marriage Today helpful — it includes how to avoid the most common reasons for divorce.

But if you’re just looking for a “tune up”, relationship counselor Mort Fertel has free advice on turning your marriage around!

If you have any tips on helping your spouse through financial difficulties, feel free to comment below — or join the discussion on “Quips and Tips for Love Relationships”!

About Me

quips tips love relationshipsI'm glad you're here! My name is Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen; my husband Bruce and I live in Vancouver, BC with our critters. We can't have kids, and are learning to accept whatever life brings - both good and bad. I have an MSW (Master of Social Work) from UBC, and degrees in Education and Psychology. I hope you say hello below - I can't give relationship advice, but writing can bring you clarity and insight.

  3 Responses to “6 Tips for Helping Your Spouse Through Financial Difficulties”

  1. Thank you for writing about marriage and financial problems. It’s a big help.

  2. Frank,

    I’m glad this article helped, and I hope you and your wife find supportive ways to help each other through your financial difficulties. If you have any questions or need further resources, please ask!

    Blessings,
    Laurie

  3. Hi,

    This was just what I was looking for, because my wife and I are having serious money problems and I don’t know how to solve them. She’s sad and depressed. I gave her some information on debt relief and credit scores, but it may be the kind of support she doesn’t need. Thanks for this information.

    FP

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